Friday, December 26, 2008

How To Set Up Your GTD Email

Today is day 3 of my Getting Things Done GTD Thirty Day Challenge and is about how to set up your GTD email. Because of the way the internet works, I need to setup links on other sites to help drive traffic to this one. Because of that I've posted today's GTD challenge entry on a hubpage for you to view. The link to the hubpage is:

How to set up your GTD email

Monday, December 1, 2008

How To Set Up Your Trash, Shredding

Today is day four of my Getting Things Done GTD Thirty Challenge. Yesterday, we spent time identifying where all of your work comes from and the need to make sure that you channel everything into your GTD system through designated inboxes that you have clearly identified and thus will know to check them. I also encouraged you to make a word or excel file of your list of inboxes to start the basis for a daily review. If you haven't done day one, be sure and complete that step.

I'm going to work my way clockwise around the ring of the workflow diagram to continue our discussion of getting your GTD setup complete BEFORE you start collecting and processing your stuff. The reason for this is because if you are missing a piece of your setup, it will backlog your system.

The next component around the ring is your trash. I think trash does deserve some discussion and for the most part setting up your trash will be an easy thing. So, day two should be easy! Did I say go back and do day one yet? Oh I did, that's right. Well for those of you reading ahead, make sure you complete each step.

There are three things you can do with trash.

1. Throw it away without shredding
2. Shred it
3. Recycle it

In my case, I don't really recycle at this point so I have the first two.

When I first set up my GTD system, I noticed that during my processing I'd find things I didn't want to file but wanted to shred. Credit card offers, convenience checks, old statements. I hadn't really integrated my shredding into my system and therefore created a backlog of paper sitting in bags waiting to be shredded.

Then, I finally started taking my shredder on the road with me. I used to even throw the bags in my car and shred in the hotel while I watched TV. Once I got that backlog shredded, and wore out my shredder, I bought a new one.

TIP: Make sure that you buy a crosscut shredder that cuts your paper both ways. Here is an excellent shredder I'd recommend you pick up.

Fellowes 32197 Powershred SB-97Cs Shredder

When you process make sure that you have your trash can, shredder and recycling box right by you when you process your inbox. When I travel, I have a folder called "FILE, OUT, SHRED" and I put everything that needs shredding in there when I am travelling. (I no longer take my shredder with me...) Then, when I get home I shred it.

As a final word on trash, make sure that you throw away as much as you can. I did a video on trash and you might find more on trash that I failed to mention but I can't remember for sure.



Well, that's it for today. As I get time, I'll add more to my Getting Things Done GTD Thirty Day Challenge.

Saturday, November 29, 2008

How To Set Up GTD Inboxes

This is day one of my Getting Things Done GTD Thirty Day Challenge and the first place we are going to start with is setting up your GTD system and more specifically your inboxes.

As we go through the challenge, I'm going to encourage you to take a long range approach to setting up your GTD system. I suggest that you start with the front end of your system and perfect it one step at a time.

Before you start running stuff through your system, your first order of business is to get your GTD system completely setup before you start collecting, processing and so on. What I did was take the GTD workflow diagram in the book on page 32, (and also available on David Allen's website in pdf format) and look at each component.

You'll notice that at the top it shows the first thing in your system is "IN." This is where you start. When I first started setting up my GTD system, it was my feeling that "IN" only referred to my physical inbox and my email inbox. However, when looking at "IN," open your mind to where everything comes into your life. You then want to make sure that you take all of that stuff and funnel into your inboxes.

This is the first skill you want to learn to master. Make sure everything runs through your designated inboxes. The toughest thing to get into your GTD system are your notes. You know the things you write on napkins. The backs of papers, anywhere you can find. Get into the habit of using one capture location like a spiral index cards or notepad to make all of your notes. If you cannot get it into your system, call your voice mail and leave the information there or text yourself a note for later collection. Get it into the system so you will not lose it!

What really matters here is that you create a net wide enough to capture everything into your workflow. I know at first, I felt overwhelmed by the sheer volume of stuff sitting in my inboxes. The thing is, don't focus on the volume, focus on the GTD workflow. You have the same amount to do, whether you hide it or not. Let the system work for you by letting it create a place to park everything so you know where it is and we will worry about doing later.

So, here is the GTD plan.

1. Get each component of your system in place, starting with inboxes.
2. Perfect each component one at a time.
3. Don't start with collection. Start with your setup. Start with your inboxes.

Think of all the places that your stuff enters your life and make a list of each place. Your list might look like this:

Physical inbox
Email inbox
Voice mail
Text messages
Snail mail
A capture tool like index cards, notepads, etc.
Fax machine

Remember too that you might have more than one physical inbox. Maybe one at work, one at home and one in your briefcase. I have more than one snail mailbox, voice mail and emails as well.

Your revised list might look like this then:

Voice mail 9693
Voice mail 8582
Voice mail 6328
Voice mail 3775
Voice mail 6116
Text 9693
Text 8582
Text inbox in Blackberry
Alerts 9693
Alerts 8582
Email glg
Email blackberry
Email bbbones
Email kidsmakemoney
Email ttEmail tt(1)
Paper index cards
Paper note pad
Paper notes on action lists
Paper notes
Paper loose in car
Paper in wallet
Paper on printer
Paper in project folders
Paper on fax machine
Mailbox 12814
Mailbox 1508
Mailbox 11650
Mailbox 8906
Physical inbox folder in briefcase
Physical inbox home

Get the idea? Make a complete list of all of your inboxes in a word file or excel spreadsheet because later on down the road we will be using that list to create a daily review.

Also, make sure that if you don't have an inbox to collect stuff make sure you put one in place. I didn't use to have one at home or in my briefcase and now I do. I'd suggest that you get a large inbox and preferrably one that stands alone, not those stackable trays. Get something sturdy and big.

Since I travel a lot, I used to take on the road with me a large plastic container, like for files at first, then downsized to a smaller plastic container. Now I carry a folder in my briefcase for my inbox. It took a couple of years to get to that point. Be patient. Just get started and you will pick up momentum.

Here is a video I did on inboxes that has some additional tips.



OK. That's it for today. I'm working on Getting Things Done GTD Thirty Day Challenge as I get time and look for the next day soon.

Sunday, November 23, 2008

Welcome To The GTD Thirty Day Challenge

Introduction To The GTD Thirty Day Challenge

Welcome to my Getting Things Done GTD Thirty Day Challenge. I'm pleased to put together my GTD next action plan to help you get the most out of Getting Things Done by David Allen. I am nearly a black belt at Getting Things Done but don't worry if you are not. Just get started and try and do better each day. Start at the beginning. Work to get one component of your system in shape and then work on the next.

When I first started around 2005, I didn't even know how to set up a calendar (which I am ashamed to say), and had stacks of paper and thousands of emails. Now, it's all under control and organized in my system.

I think the book gives you the impression that you can get your GTD system in shape in a weekend and all is perfect from there. But for me, it didn't happen that way. I started small with email, then moved on to my calendar and then to the other areas of my system over a period of months and years to the point where now I have empty inboxes and an empty head.

I think that's what we all want from GTD. The realization of the stress-free productivity that David Allen promised us. Our inboxes at zero. An empty and clear head. I am hear to tell you that the system does work as advertised IF you apply it. I've been a student of Allen's system for several years now and can attest to that.

What follows in the GTD Thirty Day Challenge is the roadmap I followed to get to black belt status. If you are joining me as I get started making these posts, you may not find all 30 lessons yet. Be patient. They are on my project list and will work their way into the challenge as soon as possible.

The thing about the internet is that you can't get traffic without content. And, you don't feel like putting out content if you have no traffic. For now, I am writing these posts live so the internet can find them and index them so it is possible that some of you will find them before they are complete because I don't expect anyone to find them. Surprisingly, they've already been seen around the world - see the update below.

Once the lessons are here, work your way through them. I am not going to take them away. I can't stress enough the process you should follow. Master one area and then move onto the next. Work at your own pace and don't beat yourself up about it if you struggle from time to time. Everyone does.

GTD Next Actions

1. Buy Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

2. Visit the Getting Things Done forum there. Many questions are already answered there.

3. Use the comments section below to introduce yourself. Let us know where you are from and where you are in your journey with Getting Things Done.

UPDATE: So far, I’ve had people from Australia, the Netherlands, Germany, France, Canada, Japan and more come to these pages already to work on setting up or improving their GTD setup. I’ve even had a chance to talk with a few people and am starting to make some friends worldwide now. It’s amazing how the internet can reach so many people.

4. If you haven't signed up for my email updates, go to my Black Belt GTD Project to get on my list.

5. Follow me on Twitter: BlackBeltGTD

6. If you like what you read, click the "ShareThis" button below. It will help get the word out about the challenge.

That's all for today and look forward to talking with you again on Day 1 of the GTD Thirty Day Challenge.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

How To Use A GTD Checklist

If it's your desire to become a black belt at getting things done, then you need to start developing a GTD checklist for everything you need to do.

Why? To get everything else off of your mind.

You see, as good as getting things done is, I don't think that it goes far enough in emptying the brain of the mundane tasks that I have to each and every day. I want to wake up and know what I need to do without thinking.

Once you've got your system in place and it's working for you, then you need to perfect it and you do that by breaking everything down into a gtd checklist.

You want to be like the NFL coach with the big sheet of paper that tells you what to do in every situation that you might face during the day. Ever wonder why they do that? It's because they have spent hours and hours of time knowing every decision they'll need to make in a game and boiled it down to one big checklist. You need to do the same.

The Daily Review GTD Checklist

Use your planning time to plot out what the perfect day would look like if it happened exactly as you planned it. At first, you may not be sure what the perfect day should look like and so therefore, you'll want to start small and write down what you do in the course of a day.

Get up at 7am
Walk for 30 minutes
Eat a breakfast
Take a shower
Get email inbox to zero
Check voice mail
Empty physical inbox

And so on. Break everything down and don't leave anything out. The more specific you are the better. When your daily review GTD checklist is complete, you won't have to think about what you need to do you'll have already thought that part out and you can get right down to doing. When you are not sure what the next action is, you can review your GTD checklist to see.

I suggest that you break your list down into at least two parts:

1. A morning checklist
2. And, an end of day checklist

Don't worry if you compile a long checklist. Most of the actions, you do anyway and this will make things more of a habit for you.

The benefits of doing this are:

1. You'll know each thing you need to do everyday.
2. You won't forget to review anything
3. You'll know what done looks like, or when work is finished.

That last one is a big one.

I work for myself and therefore, am constantly thinking about work. Work never seems to be done. Even with David Allen's getting things done system, gtd made me feel better about knowing what had to be done, but not when I could call it quits for the day and know I didn't forget anything important.

Getting Things Done Fast

Once you know what you have to do, the next thing you can work on once your GTD checklist is complete is the speed you do it. Make a place to note the time you started working on your checklist and when you finished.

Once you've completed a daily review as well as weekly review, you'll know that you have mastered your workflow when you then see how fast you can get through it, and later learn how to delegate it.

I can't tell you how great it is to know:

I've reviewed all my voice mail, email and physical inboxes and they are at zero
I've review my calendar to know what is on my plate for the day
I've completed my checklist to know that I've got a system I'm working and know what done looks like

Get to work mastering your workflow today by analyzing your work to the smallest component. A GTD system is not complete with out a daily review GTD checklist.

Monday, November 3, 2008

About Me

I am a getting things done junkie. I spend a lot of time perfecting my getting things done gtd system.

I work in sales and use GTD everyday. I have since 2005 ever since I picked up David Allen's book. I hope my site and tips help you implement your GTD system and get you to a black belt level. If it has, then I encourage you to make a donation as I do this site for free.

To contact me, just leave a post on this page.

Your Black Belt Mentor,
Michael
Getting Things Done with GTD

Saturday, October 11, 2008

Getting Things Done GTD Tips 1

You’ll get the most out of these tips if you have already read David Allen’s book Getting Things Done and started the implementation of your GTD system. In my opinion, this is one of the best business books on the market. If you have not started that process then you’ll want to start there and then come back to this guide. This guide is meant for those who understand Getting Things Done and have a GTD system but who are struggling to get their inboxes processed to zero each and every day.

Getting Things Done GTD Inboxes Tips

In order to get to become Black Belt with your GTD inboxes, they need to be checked and processed daily to zero. At first, this will be difficult, but with time, you can get your inboxes to zero each and every day. In addition, you’ll need to commit yourself and others to funneling everything into your inbox system so that your system is airtight and nothing falls through the cracks.

Three years ago, I started with stacks and stacks of paper and thousands of emails in my inbox. If you would have told me then that I could process my inboxes to zero and be getting things done with GTD, I would have called you nuts. To make matters worse, I work on the road about two hundred days a year. Today, though, I reduce my inboxes to zero on a daily basis. How did I do it? What follows is the exact strategy I used to get my getting things done gtd inboxes to zero each and every day.

GTD Project Outcomes

The overall outcomes for this getting things done gtd project are:

  • You’ve identified, set up and consolidated your inboxes to the fewest you need
  • You’ve made a checklist of each of your inboxes and listed them in order from easiest to hardest to get to zero and listed your physical “paper” inbox LAST
  • You’ve made sure that all of your stuff goes through your designated inboxes
  • You’ve made a checklist on how to get each inbox to zero
  • You’ve started working on mastering your inboxes on a daily basis

You’ve Identified Your Inboxes

Your first step is to identify each of your getting things done gtd inboxes. When I first setup my system, my main focus was on my physical “paper” inbox. I now know that I have many additional inboxes such as a mail box, voice mail and even an “in” folder in my briefcase. What inboxes you need will be different than mine and will be determined by your workflow situation. Take the time to analyze where your workflow is coming from and set up getting things done inboxes accordingly.

Once you’ve identified your inboxes, determine if you can eliminate your inboxes or merge them into another inbox. Email is an excellent example of where consolidation will do you the most good. I personally have several email addresses and they all go into one single account. While it might not be possible to eliminate any, review the possibility because the fewer places you have to check the better.

There are a few additional inboxes you’ll want to make sure that you have.

  • A roomy physical inbox at home and one at work
  • A folder labeled “Inbox” for your briefcase for transit. I use a plastic folder to handle all of the wear and tear of daily use
  • A capture device for note taking that you have with you at all times. I use a set of 3x5 spiraled index cards and when necessary I use my Blackberry to record notes as well

When it comes to managing your paper “in”, you’ll find that you’ll spend some time choosing your inboxes to your liking. When I started, I had a big plastic file case as my inbox for papers and now I could really get by with a folder. Your system will evolve with you and you’ll modify your setup over time but having a checklist will not. Fine tune your GTD inbox checklist to allow your work to flow fast through your system.

You’ve Made A Checklist Of Each Of Your Getting Things Done GTD Inboxes And Listed Them In Order From Easiest To Hardest To Get To Zero And Placed Your Physical Inbox LAST On The Checklist

Once you’ve identified each and every inbox, you then should make a checklist of all of the inboxes you need to check. This checklist will be the foundation for what will later become an integral part of your daily review checklist that you’ll be building into a complete Black Belt system later.

Make sure that when you make this checklist, put your physical “paper” inbox last on your list. As we check the inboxes from the top down, we will be pushing everything down to that inbox.
On the next page is my checklist of inboxes. You’ll notice that I grouped similar inboxes together.

Getting Things Done GTD Checklist:

VOICE MAIL: 8582
VOICE MAIL: 9693
VOICE MAIL: 6328
VOICE MAIL: 3775
-----------------------------------------------------------
TEXT: 8582
TEXT: 9693
-----------------------------------------------------------
MAIL: Piccadilly Circle
MAIL: Olio Road
MAIL: 86th Street
MAIL: 96th Street
-----------------------------------------------------------
DIGITAL: Blackberry
DIGITAL: Email
-----------------------------------------------------------
PAPER: Gather loose papers
PAPER: Spiral index cards
PAPER: Briefcase inbox folder in inbox
PAPER: Inbox at home/home office
-----------------------------------------------------------
GTD BLACK BELT: ALL GETTING THINGS DONE INBOXES TO ZERO
-----------------------------------------------------------

You’ve Made Sure That All Of Your StuffGoes Through Your Designated Inboxes

Once identified, commit yourself to funneling all of your stuff through the inboxes for processing. Let your family and coworkers know that they should do the same.

Make sure that you are no longer using places like your car and kitchen counters as inboxes. Also make sure that you are taking your notes in your capture tool and not on napkins and scrap pieces of paper to eliminate leakage of things that should go into “in.”

You’ve Made A Checklist OnHow To Get Each Inbox To Zero

For each inbox, figure out what it will take to get that inbox to zero and write down the steps in the form of a checklist. By doing this, you’ll take the thinking out of your processing and won’t have to think about what the next step in your processing is – you will have already thought about it.

By reducing your getting things done processing to a checklist of action steps required, you’ll realize two great benefits. The first is that you won’t have to think about your processing system while you are processing, you’ll just process. Second, you’ll know what a completed getting things done processing session feels like. And, by knowing what a completed processing session looks like, you won’t be worried about whether you’ve processed everything or not, because you’ll know.

Below are the checklists to get my inboxes to zero from easiest to hardest.

Checking Voice Mail

Get spiral index cards and pen
Check voice mail
Write down all messages on index cards
Delete all messages
Clear all alerts
Return all calls that can be returned now
Record any notes on index cards
Put notes in physical inbox
Repeat for all voice mail boxes
-----------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: ALL MESSAGES EMPTIED
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Checking Text Messages

Get spiral index cards and pen
Review text messages
Complete any two minute actions
Write down messages on index cards that require actions
Delete messages that are completed
Put notes in physical inbox
Repeat for all text message inboxes
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: ALL TEXT MESSAGES TO ZERO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Checking Mail Inboxes

Pick up mail
Open all mail
Throw away all trash
Shred private items
File all informational mail
Put remaining items in inbox
Repeat for all mail boxes
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: ALL MAIL BOXES TO ZERO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Checking Blackberry

Get spiral index cards and pen
Check Next Action Inbox
Take care of any two minute actions
Record any longer actions on index cards and put in physical in box
Dlete items in inbox
Check Next Action Waiting For
Check off any Waiting Fors completed
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: BLACKBERRY INBOX TO ZERO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Checking Email

Open email
Open calendar
Log into basecamp
Get Blackberry
Process Inbox – Mark spam, delete trash, process and move to Archive Folder less than two mnute emails and move action items to Action Folder
Review Spam folder to make sure that it’s all spam
Empty Spam
Review Yahoo! Reminders for actions and move to Action Folder
Review Waiting For folder for actions and move those to Action folder
Review To Print folder for things to print
Review Read Review folder
Process Action Folder to zero
Empty Trash
Close email
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: ALL EMAIL TO ZERO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Checking Paper Inboxes

Gather loose papers and put in physical inbox
Tear out index cards and put in physical inbox
Empty briefcase in folder into physical inbox
Set out the getting things done workflow diagram
Using the getting things done workflow diagram as a guide, work from the top down to process each paper into the system
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: ALL PAPER INBOXES TO ZERO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

You’ve Started Working
On Mastering Your Inbox On A Daily Basis


Once you’ve identified your getting things done inboxes, made a checklist of them and developed a plan to empty each inbox, your next course of action is to start mastering your inboxes on a daily basis. Start with the very first inbox on your list, follow your checklist to get it to empty.

Using my list as an example, the first inbox on my list is a voice mail box. My first benchmark I want to strive for is emptying that voice mail inbox to zero today and then each day following. Once I have it to zero and am emptying it every day, I’ll move onto the next inbox and do the same thing – mastering one inbox at time.

The goal at first is get some “wins” or a feeling that at least something in my system is at Black Belt and move Black Belt down through my system of inboxes one inbox at a time.

More importantly, by creating these checklist, you’ve defined what done looks like for each inbox and should then create a master daily processing checklist merging each inbox checklist into one comprehensive daily checklist.

My Daily Getting Things Done GTD Processing Checklist

Get spiral index cards and pen
Check voice mail 8582
Write down all messages on index cards
Delete all messages
Clear all alerts
Return all calls that can be returned now
Record any notes on index cards
Put notes in physical inbox
Repeat for voice mail boxes 9693, 6328, 3375
Review text messages 8582
Complete any two minute actions
Write down messages on index cards that require actions
Delete messages that are completed
Put notes in physical inbox
Repeat for text message inbox 9693
Pick up mail from all locations
Combine and open all mail
Throw away all trash
Shred private items
File all informational mail
Put remaining items in inbox
Check Black Berry Next Action Inbox
Take care of any two minute actions
Record any longer actions on index cards and put in physical in box
Delete items in inbox
Check Black Berry Next Action Waiting For
Check off any Waiting For’s completed
Open email
Open calendar
Log into Basecamp
Get Blackberry
Process Inbox – Mark spam, delete trash, process and move to Archive Folder less than two minute emails and move action items to Action Folder
Review Spam folder to make sure that it’s all spam
Empty Spam
Review Yahoo! Reminders for actions and move to Action Folder
Review Waiting For folder for actions and move those to Action folder
Review To Print folder for things to print
Review Read Review folder
Process Action Folder to zero
Empty Trash
Close email
Gather loose papers and put in physical inbox
Tear out index cards and put in physical inbox
Emty briefcase in folder into physical inbox
Set out the workflow diagram
Using the getting things done workflow diagram as a guide, work from the top down to process each paper into the system
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
GETTING THINGS DONE GTD BLACK BELT: INBOXES TO ZERO
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Process Up To An Hour Once In The MorningAnd One Half Hour At The End Of The Day

I use a checklist similar to the one above each morning shortly after I get up and at the end of the day. Since I work from home or in a hotel, it might be easier for me to get right into it. I allow an hour in the morning and at night. But as my system has gotten better, many times, I do not have to use all of that time. If you can only process in a half hour, do it in a half hour.

Carve the time out of your schedule and make it a sacred time just like it’s suggested that you do with your weekly review.

What you’ll find is that by using your checklist, you can work faster than you thought. Note the start time that you begin processing and how long it takes you to finish. If you do not get finished, the next time you process, try and get further down the checklist, trying to do better each time.

With time, you’ll find your end of day processing may not take but a few minutes.

Dealing With An Initial Backlog

Once your GTD processing system is set up and running, you can intensify your getting things done collection efforts. If you are like me, your physical inbox will be overwhelmed from the get go and you might have thousands of emails backlogged in your system. These will be the two types of inboxes that are hardest to get to zero.

Here is what I recommend.

For Paper

Scan your backlog for anything pressing put it in your inbox
Stack your backlog in a specific location. A big box, corner of your office for later processing
Keep current on anything new that comes in your inbox
Work through your back log during the time you schedule each day to do your processing and when you schedule your weekly review

For Email

Scan your email for anything pressing and move to your Action folder
Create a folder called Action Backlog and move all backlogged emails there for later processing
Keep current on anything new that comes in your inbox
Work through your back log during the time you schedule each day to do your processing and when you schedule your weekly review

You Can Use The Weekly Review To Get Your Processing Under Control

Chances are that when you started with GTD, you were not doing a weekly review but maybe getting more things done. Many people complain that when they start doing weekly reviews that they take several hours and they get frustrated.

Although you can follow the weekly review structure, I suggest that you start by giving yourself permission to use that time to get rid of your backlog and work on getting the front end of your system in good working order.

Later, you can fine tune the weekly review, once you solve the problems on the front end.

Falling Off The GTD Bandwagon

You’ll inevitably get overwhelmed from time to time from too much in your inboxes and you’ll lose the momentum you generated. Don’t worry about it. Pick up your checklists and start from the beginning again. After awhile, you’ll fall off the wagon a lot less because you’ll have a roadmap already made to get you right back on the wagon. And, you’ll recover a lot faster.

Next Action: You Can Do It!

Set realistic expectations on getting your inboxes to zero and you’ll slowly improve your system to a habit of reducing them to zero each and every day. I can tell you from experience that it is without a doubt one of the best feelings you can have at work, to have nothing in your inboxes and in a trusted system.

For me it didn’t happen overnight, but now that I am there, it’s an easy thing to keep that way. If I can do it, anybody can. Good Luck!

Visit http://www.blackbeltproject.com/ for more information.

If you follow these getting things done GTD tips, you'll be getting things done with your GTD inboxes in no time flat.

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Getting Things Done GTD Tips

Welcome to Getting Things Done GTD Tips. This site provides tips and techniques for people beginning GTD. If you have questions not covered in Getting Things Done GTD Tips please feel free to email your question to support@gettingthingsdonereview.com.